Yes, It’s True…

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We’re moving up in the cyber world, folks!

I’m happy to announce that I’ve revamped my blog and you can now find my homesteading adventures here.

PLEASE be sure to subscribe!  I could sure use the traffic… besides, it’s makes me feel important!

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The Meaning of Patriots’ Day…

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Today’s post is to honor those affected by the tragic event that took place in Boston on April 15th, Patriots’ Day…

Massachusetts and Maine observe Patriots’ Day on the third Monday of every April.  Patriots’ Day commemorates the battles of Lexington and Concord in 1775 which was the start of the American Revolutionary War.   Prior to 1775, the area that is now the eastern part of the United States mainly consisted of British colonies controlled by the United Kingdom. The American Revolutionary War was a major step in the independence of the United States. The first battles in this war were fought in the areas of Lexington and Concord, near Boston, Massachusetts, on April 19, 1775.  For this reason, the third Monday in April is symbolic for the emerging independence of the new country.

Paul Revere is among the patriots who are remembered on Patriots’ Day. The American silversmith is known for spreading the word of the Boston Tea Party to New York and Philadelphia, and for warning the Lexington Minutemen about the British invasion in 1775. The story of his “midnight” ride to Lexington to discuss action plans against the British has been poeticized.  With a clatter of horse hooves, Paul Revere rides from Boston, shouting warnings that British soldiers are on the march.

The Boston Marathon, the world’s oldest annual marathon, is run each year on Patriots’ Day.

Along with various events around the city, Bostonians celebrate the battles of Lexington and Concord in a touching act of community, a marathon in which strangers cheer on strangers, and runners push themselves toward the finish line with charming grit.

On April 15, 2013, Patriots’ Day, as I watched the events unfold on television, I saw rescuers running towards the wounded in acts of true heroism.

In the end, the terrorist(s) will fail because Bostonians did not turn from their fellow citizen — they turned toward them. And that is the real root of mankind.

Patriots’ Day.  It is a day that celebrates the free and fiercely independent spirit of us all.

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Coming Full Circle…

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When I was a little girl living in Hawaii my parents sent my brother and I on an airplane, alone, to spend summers with my grandparents in Northern Minnesota.  I dreaded those summer getaways… all I could think of was spending my summer with “old” people, out in the middle of nowhere, with absolutely nothing to do.  It was time spent in the garden, stealing apples from old man Marco’s apple tree, dirt road rides in search of wild critters, hanging out at the lake diving for clams, and walking down the street to the corner store to buy penny candy.  Oh, and, yes, going to the annual polka festival.  A night out to eat was to the local Bonanza, where all I longed for was the lollipop at the end of my meal.

To top it all off, I was somehow taught, led to believe, that growing your own food or buying local was embarrassing, going beneath yourself.  I vividly remember my grandfather coming home one day with local strawberries.  All I could do was laugh at the thought that Minnesota strawberries were so much better than a strawberry from elsewhere (like I was some expert that strawberries from a tropical island were so much better).   I also remember being so critical over a fireworks show in town, thinking how could such a local celebration be so much better than seeing one in a huge city like New York City?

As I write this blog I am amazed at how much I disliked those times.  How could I not have appreciated and enjoyed all that I did, and learned?  It’s so sad.

Here I am today living in a simple home, with a few acres, out in the country in Maine.  The life I have today is actually is no different than my grandparents.  Gardens, fruit trees, fishing, hunting, buying local, and supporting community efforts.  I have come full circle.  Everything old is new again.  The passion I have for this lifestyle, for me and for my family is deep.  It is important to myself and to my husband.  Shouldn’t our kids know that locally grown food is so much better than food grown thousands miles away?  Shouldn’t our kids know the importance of where our food comes from?  Shouldn’t our kids know basic outdoor skills?  Shouldn’t our kids experience green trees and fresh air?

I wish I could go back in time and enjoy my Minnesota visits more.  I wish I could tell my grandparents how much those visits influenced who and where I am today.  I only hope that both are looking down at me from above smiling… and, of course, shouting, “I told so”‘!

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This Week’s Project Download…

You would think that with  my husband home I’d be able to get a lot more done with the the extra hands.  No such luck.  However, I am happy to report my husband took on a couple of projects this past week.  He busted out his muscles and did quite a bit for us!  Thank you, deary (insert belly rub)!

The weather was great this weekend.  The kids spent both days outside, ALL day.  One of the things I love about our little homestead is that the kids can go outside and literally play to their hearts content.  They can bike up and down the road with no worries.  They can trek in to the woods and explore.  This weekend they set up a plank headed towards the pond so they can put some chairs out and, as my daughter says, “chill”.  The best part of the weekend… all of our neighbor kids were out four wheeling together.  Everyone had so much fun!

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I have a love/hate relationship with my brother-in-law.  He is extremely free spirited and will show up at our house on a whim.  I hate that.  My kids love him to pieces, and there isn’t anything he wouldn’t do for my kids.  I love that.  So, I accept his quirkiness and feed him a ton of food every time he shows up for a visit.

A few months ago, while my husband was away at sea, he shows up to the house.  As he is playing WWF with the kids my daughter’s bed breaks.  She has been sleeping on a bed held up by a few old books.  This week my husband made a bed frame for my daughter out of pallets.  Some may think it’s a bit cheesy, but she loves it!  He put black lights under the slats that creates a glow in the dark effect at night for her.

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Speaking of pallets… we have a bunch of them.  A trip to a box store proved pay dirt.  We’ll be making a potato bin as well as a lettuce/herb garden.  I’ll be sure to post pictures once they are built.

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The tree house flooring is near completion.  The kids are quite eager to finally get their bean bags inside.  My daughter created the first sign for the tree house.  I hope that in a couple more weeks all will be done and the kids can spend countless hours hiding away.  I am hoping for this tree house to be the ultimate reading room for them!

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My reading was very poor this week.  I’m trying really hard to finish a book I had been so excited to read.  Unfortunately, my progress has been slow.  I am bound and determined to finish it this week though!

A couple of weeks ago I read “I Funny: A Middle School Story” by James Patterson (yes, the same James Patterson that writes thrillers – he also writes children’s books).  It was a quick read about a boy, Jamie Grimm, who wants to become the world’s greatest stand-up comedian.  Jamie has a lot of personal obstacles but keeps a wonderful sense of humor.  He decides to enter a contest called The Planet’s Funniest Kid Comic.  I found myself cheering Jamie on the whole way.  He is an extremely likable boy who is amazingly strong.  Not only was this book clever and funny, it was heartwarming.

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Mooing over Milk…

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When I was a little girl living in Japan I remember my mom had glass bottled milk delivered to our doorstep.  At that time there was no relevance to it.  As a teenager I thought it was so “uncool” to have some old Japanese guy deliver milk by bicycle to our doorstep.

Fast forward to today and I can’t believe we actually had milk delivered that way!  It was way cool!  If only we could get our milk delivered that way again.

Even though we can’t get personal milk delivery where I live I am lucky to have a local dairy farm a few miles from my home.  That is where I purchase my milk.  And, yes, it comes in glass bottles!

Aside from the “coolness” of having your milk in glass bottles there are actually many advantages in doing so.  Here are some of them:

  • Glass milk bottles can be sterilized and reused multiple times.  We return our milk bottles to the dairy farm for a refund on the deposit we pay for the bottle.  
  • The dairy farm sells milk in half gallon, quart and pint sizes.  I often keep a few bottles at home for multiple uses.  I use the pint bottles to hold paint brushes.  The quarts make great vases for my favorite flower, sunflowers.  The half gallon bottles make great sun tea in the summertime.  Even my husband uses the pint bottle for his early morning coffee while he commutes to work!
  • Like I just mentioned above, glass can be recycled indefinitely.  Plastic, on the other hand, degrades during the recycling process and cannot be reused in the same manner.  Yes, tetra pak milk cartons can be recycled, but they are not accepted by most curbside recycling programs.  Some research I’ve found suggests that a majority just end up in landfills.
  • Plastic is made from petroleum, and its manufacturer is highly polluting.  Research suggests that one 16 ounce bottle generates 100 times the toxic emissions as making the same bottle out of glass.  Pretty amazing, isn’t it?
  • There has been a lot of chatter lately about chemicals leaching from plastic.  It is extremely worrisome when that very plastic holds our food.  Glass, on the other hand, is known to be safe.
  • If you buy milk in glass bottles chances are you are buying local.  Buying local supports your community.  Buying local typically supports small local business.  Bottom line, buying local is just better.

There are many more reasons why I think buying milk in glass bottles is beneficial.  But, when it comes down to it, I just love the nostalgia of it all.  So, even if the above weren’t facts I’d still buy milk in glass bottles.  Knowing that it is much better from an environmental standpoint just makes me much happier with my choice.

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This post was featured at the Homestead Barn Hop.

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This Week’s Project Download…

Good morning all!  A day late but… I hope everyone had a very Happy Easter!

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This year I lost my daughter to the Easter Bunny tradition.  Although it was sad I was happy she could help mom and dad, and shop for goodies for her little brother and baby sister.  Of course, she got to pick out her own basket goodies as well, which worked out well in her favor.  I always add toothbrushes and toothpaste in the kids baskets.  It never hurts to remind my little ones about the importance of dental hygiene!

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This year I also added books.  My daughter got “Middle School:  My Brother is a Big, Fat Liar” and my son got his very first Magic Tree House book, “Dinosaurs Before Dark”.  Unlike his artistic sister my son is very factual.  Both are very excited to start reading their books!

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This week was more of a planning project week.  It’s finally warming up enough where we could open the tree house back up.  We still need to put down some simple wood flooring and finish the roofing.  Right now it looks like the tree house will have a metal roof, which will end up being a lot nicer than the roof we have on our house!

The kids love it.

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Our veggies are finally starting to sprout.  We can’t wait to finally put them in the ground!

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This past week I read “Anya’s Ghost”.  I found out about this book from my daughter’s teacher who has a blog of her own, The Late Bloomer’s Book Blog.

This was my first time reading a graphic novel and I must say the graphics are excellent.  It is a novel for young teens, especially girls.  The story is quick and speaks about social anxiety, body image, friendship, and ghostbusting.  The main character, Anya, smokes which I did not like at all.  But, all in all, it was a a quick read and was a good graphic novel to read.

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Mucking it Up in Mud Season…

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When I first moved to the New England 14 years ago I had never set foot on the East Coast.  Yet I had this odd fascination with the East Coast lifestyle.  Somehow that lifestyle seemed much more fitting to me.  Living a majority of my life overseas in Japan, I was also fortunate to live in places like California, Guam and Hawaii.  Pretty awesome, right?  Even with those wonderful opportunities I missed something… I never truly experienced  the change of seasons.   So when I met my husband I was lucky to discover he was from Maine… which eventually led us “home” to raise our family on our beautiful mini-homestead.

Spring is a tricky time in Northern New England.  Yes, spring officially starts in March, although you really don’t reap the warmer temperature benefits until much later.  But, in all honesty, there never really is a true spring up here.  It’s mud season.  This is when all the snow and ice melts. Sometimes it rains. Sometimes it snows. More often, we get a wintery mix and erratic swings in climate. Nature is at its most capricious.

Just looking out my door I can see the soft ground peeking through the melting snow.  It’s soft, it’s squishy… it’s mud.  And at this homestead it means a lot of dirt dragging in the house.  Not only from my kids, but the dog and, worst of all, my husband (sorry, honey, but it’s true).  Mud season also means it’s time to put up those heavy winter coats and break out the spring weather wear.  Fleeces for chilly mornings and evenings, rain coats for the slushy mess, and muck boots to trek out in to the yard or, as in my kids case, just play.

Mud season is probably the most dreaded season of the year.  Yes, even more dreaded than winter.  However, it’s the price of living in Maine. Our winter brings fresh snow and bright blue skies; autumn has the most glorious foliage and summer, with moderate heat and low humidity, is perfection. Spring does not really kick in until May, and then everything blooms at once. I love living in a place with all the seasons, even if I’m counting the days to daffodils and tulips.

When I think about it mud season is not all bad. There are no crowds. Days are getting longer. Shovels rest while snow piles shrink. Empty beaches are beautifully surreal. The sidewalks around town are finally clear of ice.  We’ve been hibernating all winter so throw on a pair of your mud boots and enjoy the outdoors!

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This post was featured at the Homestead Barn Hop.

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